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  1. #9
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    Re: BCCI not covered by RTI law


    dear friends,

    I think, before giving such decision, CIC should advocate in favour of applicant and such decisions should be revived.

    ra katkam.


    › Find content similar to: BCCI not covered by RTI law



  2. #10
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    Re: BCCI not covered by RTI law


    Talking about the BCCI let's accept that it is not accountable to Govt. of India and to the people of india . In such a case, why should not the goverment consider recovering the cost of security and facilities provided during the matches and to the visiting and home teams. why should they be granted stadia at token lease, why not at commercial rate, why should they be allowed to burn flood lights, when India is running short of electricity. let them arrange for their security arrangemnets, their stadia and their electricity and then let's see if they can boast to be the richest board!

  3. #11
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    Re: BCCI not covered by RTI law


    Dear sirs,

    We have to strongly advocate and fight for the total taking over of BCCI by Govt. of India.

  4. #12
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    Re: BCCI not covered by RTI law



    Rakatkam,
    May I remind you--this place is not for advocating any campaign or movement or fight.
    Defeat is not final when you fall down. It is final when you refuse to get up.

  5. #13
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    Get BCCI under RTI too


    Big Picture - Get BCCI under RTI too


    AS reported by Shri PRADEEP MAGAZINE, in Hindustan Times, April 03 2010 ,Page 23

    FAIR DEAL Clarity required in sports bodies including cricket THE BCCI, WHICH FOR REASONS BEYOND COMPREHENSION, SHIELDS ITSELF BEHIND THE ARGUMENT THAT IT IS A PRIVATE BODY AND CANNOT BE QUESTIONED BY THE STATE.

    Amidst the euphoria of the IPL competing strongly with the weepy prime time serials, the hysterical media has almost ignored a very significant move towards forcing our sports fed- erations to become accountable and transparent in their func- tioning, especially in matters financial.

    Sports Minister MS Gill needs to be complimented for bringing all the federations into the ambit of the Right To Information (RTI) Act, which in turn means the public will now have the right to know how and where the money given to them by the government (tax payer) goes.

    Is the money being spent for the purpose it is meant for or does most of it get siphoned off, as is alleged by many?

    However, the sports body which generates enormous revenues and profits that could be the envy of any rich corporate body, unfortunately, does not fall under the gambit of this Act.

    The reason for the exepm- tion presumably being it is a private body which does not take a single pie from the gov- ernment and hence cannot come under government or public scrutiny.

    This is a false presumption, if one goes by the 2004 High Court ruling in the PIL filed against the Board by Rahul Mehra, a lawyer by profession, but an inveterate sports fan by nature. By admitting the PIL, the Court had in its judgment clearly said that the BCCI may be a private body, but it per- forms a public function and therefore comes under Article 226 of the Constitution (public scrutiny).

    The BCCI, which for reasons beyond comprehension, is loathe to subject itself to pub- lic scrutiny (unless it has some- thing to hide) shields itself behind the argument that it is a private body and cannot be questioned by the state.

    BCCI conveniently forgets that not only does it get tax ben- efits, it also gets other largesse from the state, like stadias at throwaway rates and, most importantly, is allowed to use the name India for the team which represents it. It gets these concessions because it is deemed a charitable organisation which performs a public function.

    Ever since the economic lib- eralisation in the nineties coin- cided with private television channels being allowed to enter the Indian market, the BCCI has been getting richer by the day.

    Without doubt this has had a huge positive effect on the game with greater funding at the grass root level and the play- ers themselves reaping the enormous benefits of the eco- nomic boom, fuelled by the mul- tiplying popularity of the game in the country.

    Post IPL, the money which the Board is handling has gone into billions of dollars and, as the custodian of the game whose main stakeholders are its fans, shouldn't it be mandatory for them to come under greater public scrutiny?

    By their own admission, all the members of the board and its office-bearers are performing an honorary job and take no salaries for services they render.

    The Indian public should salute them for this selfless atti- tude, which presumably stems from their great “love“ for the game. If that be the case then what stops them from willingly coming under the RTI Act, even if the government for some legal reasons is “unable“ to do so.

    They should remember that the money, which is coming into their coffers is because of the millions of die-hard fans who support the game and spend their money, time and energy in cheering their team and their players.

    The reason fans support the Board is because they believe it is “building“ India and not “selling“ brand India to the highest bidder. That is why it is impor- tant that the Board's accounts should come under public scrutiny.

    HindustanTimes ePaper - Article

  6. #14
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    Get BCCI under RTI too


    As reported at hindustantimes.com on April 2, 2010

    Amidst the euphoria of the IPL competing strongly with the weepy prime time serials, the hysterical media has almost ignored a very significant move towards forcing our sports federations to become accountable and transparent in their functioning, especially in matters financial.
    Sports Minister MS Gill needs to be complimented for bringing all the federations into the ambit of the Right To Information (RTI) Act, which in turn means the public will now have the right to know how and where the money given to them by the government (tax-payer) goes.
    Is the money being spent for the purpose it is meant for or does most of it get siphoned off, as is alleged by many?
    However, the sports body which generates enormous revenues and profits that could be the envy of any rich corporate body, unfortunately, does not fall under the gambit of this Act.
    The reason for the exepmtion presumably being it is a private body which does not take a single pie from the government and hence cannot come under government or public scrutiny.
    This is a false presumption, if one goes by the 2004 High Court ruling in the PIL filed against the Board by Rahul Mehra, a lawyer by profession, but an inveterate sports fan by nature. By admitting the PIL, the Court had in its judgment clearly said that the BCCI may be a private body, but it performs a public function and therefore comes under Article 226 of the Constitution (public scrutiny).
    The BCCI, which for reasons beyond comprehension, is loathe to subject itself to public scrutiny (unless it has something to hide) shields itself behind the argument that it is a private body and cannot be questioned by the state.
    BCCI conveniently forgets that not only does it get tax benefits, it also gets other largesse from the state, like stadias at throwaway rates and, most importantly, is allowed to use the name India for the team which represents it. It gets these concessions because it is deemed a charitable organisation which performs a public function.
    Ever since the economic liberalisation in the nineties coincided with private television channels being allowed to enter the Indian market, the BCCI has been getting richer by the day.
    Without doubt this has had a huge positive effect on the game with greater funding at the grass root level and the players themselves reaping the enormous benefits of the economic boom, fuelled by the multiplying popularity of the game in the country.
    Post IPL, the money which the Board is handling has gone into billions of dollars and, as the custodian of the game whose main stakeholders are its fans, shouldn’t it be mandatory for them to come under greater public scrutiny?
    By their own admission, all the members of the board and its office-bearers are performing an honorary job and take no salaries for services they render.
    The Indian public should salute them for this selfless attitude, which presumably stems from their great “love” for the game. If that be the case then what stops them from willingly coming under the RTI Act, even if the government for some legal reasons is “unable” to do so.
    They should remember that the money, which is coming into their coffers is because of the millions of die-hard fans who support the game and spend their money, time and energy in cheering their team and their players.
    The reason fans support the Board is because they believe it is “building” India and not “selling” brand India to the highest bidder. That is why it is important that the Board’s accounts should come under public scrutiny.

    Source: Get BCCI under RTI too- Hindustan Times

  7. #15
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    Re: BCCI not covered by RTI law


    As reported by Swati Chaturvedi in cricket.zeenews.com on 13 April 2011:
    http://cricket.zeenews.com/fullstory.aspx?nid=37644

    BCCI a public body: Sports Ministry

    New Delhi: In a huge set-back to Sharad Pawar and other political heavy-weights such as BJP`s Arun Jaitley, the Union Sports Ministry has recognized the Board of Cricket Control (BCCI) as a public authority.

    The BCCI had earlier gone to court on several occasions to claim that it was a private body/trust to claim several exemptions including huge tax benefits.


    Interestingly, in its battle with the Union government, the BCCI was represented by Union Minister Kapil Sibal`s son.

    Now Ajay Maken has taken a clear stand in view of a RTI petition filed and ordered the BCCI to answer the queries.
    Twitter: @cjkarira

  8. #16
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    Re: BCCI not covered by RTI law


    As reported in timesofindia.indiatimes.com on 13 April 2011:
    http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/s...ow/7972537.cms

    Is BCCI answerable under the RTI Act?

    NEW DELHI: It seems the Sports Ministry now considers Board of Control for Cricket in India answerable under the Right to Information Act as it has transferred such an application to the cricket body.

    The Central Information Commission in number of recent decisions on sports federations had declared them to be public authority covered under the RTI Act, but in 2008 Information Commissioner Padma Balasubramanian had exempted BCCI from the ambit of transparency law through her order.

    The latest order of the Sports Ministry, however, cites the October 26, 2010 decision of the Kerala High Court which declared officials of Kerala Cricket Association as public servants. The appeal against the High Court order was dismissed by the Supreme Court this year.

    "The High Court of Kerala in a case related to State Cricket Association, has ruled that the Federations are required to perform public duties by virtue of holding their offices and hence, are public servants.

    "The Supreme Court has refused to interfere with the ruling of the High Court," Joint Secretary Injeti Srinivas at the Ministry said in a reply to an RTI application seeking to know whether Supreme Court has held BCCI officials as public-servants.

    Responding to the application, Srinivas who is the Appellate Authority at the Ministry "directed" the Public Information officer "to transfer the application to BCCI for response to the specific queries pertaining to them."

    Activist Subhash Agrawal had sought to know from the Sports Ministry nature of assistance received by the BCCI from it, constitution of BCCI and its affiliated state-bodies, outline of BCCI budget for last two years, details of pending allegations of corruption etc against officials of BCCI.

    He had also demanded information on money paid separately to each of players, coaches, selectors and members of board of BCCI in last two years, assets and awards given players, coaches and others by BCCI.

    In addition, Agrawal also asked if BCCI had ever given some grant or loan to Constitution Club, New Delhi besides amount, date and purpose of such funds among other details of such financial help.
    Twitter: @cjkarira

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